Tag Archive: timing

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Folding Practice Exams into Your Study Plan

You have decided to run a marathon … heaven knows why. The longest distance you’ve ever run is … maybe a couple miles? It’s hard to remember … you accomplished that athletic feat at a so-called “fun run” in middle school, and that was so long ago that it’s hard to remember the exact distance.

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Speeding Up with Conditional Statements

Figuring out timing on the LSAT can feel impossible — you might wonder how you’ll ever be able to get through a whole section, let alone devote time to those “extra” steps like anticipating the right answer or diagramming. The catch-22, of course, is that taking the time for those extra steps is necessary (see what we did there?) for getting through a section with adequate time — if you skip them, you’re more likely to waste time and be tempted by wrong answers.

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Getting to Yes on the LSAT

Before you start law school, the one book everyone will tell you to read is Getting to Maybe. As its subtitle How to Excel on Law School Exams might suggest, it’s a tract on how to excel on law school exams. Its essential thesis is that up to law school, most exams lavishly award students who can identify the “right” answer. But a law school exam — in which complex fact patterns are devised with no clear “right” answer, requiring students to apply legal analysis to both sides of an issue — is a different beast that requires a different approach. The book describes how to live and thrive in this land of “maybe” in which law school exams exist.

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Increasing Your Speed on the LSAT

If you took the LSAT home with you overnight and worked on it as long as you needed, chances are you’d find yourself with a very impressive score. Unfortunately for many of us, it’s the speeded aspect of the exam that makes everything else about the LSAT more challenging: you need more time to read

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On Confidence and Time Pressure

The Law School Admissions Test would, of course, be substantially easier if it didn’t impose time limits. Without them, test-takers could mull over RC passages, LR stimuli, and LG intros to their hearts’ content, and debate every answer choice at length. The perceived pressure of the whole testing ordeal would abate considerably, and virtually everyone would be likely to score markedly higher in the end.

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Speeding Up on Logic Games

Recently, we went over how to get faster on the Reading Comp section of the LSAT. Now, it’s time to go over Logic Games. Finishing the Games section in time was my biggest struggle when I first took the LSAT, but you can improve your speed on the games section greatly. Here are some tips:

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Speeding Up on Reading Comp

It’s hard to finish LSAT sections in time, and for many people Reading Comp is the toughest section to get through. You have to read the passages, which can take a while, and then if you’re not sure what you’re doing on the questions you can easily end up reading whole chunks of the passage again and then the time just slips and before you know it it’s the five minute warning and how many questions are left? Oh crap, and you start to try to go faster but nothing makes sense anymore and then they call time.

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Mastering the Final Stage of Your LSAT Studies

You’ve spent months slaving over Flaw and Sufficient Assumption questions. You’re having dreams about diagramming and taking the contrapositive of conditional statements. You’ve pilgrimaged to the top of the tallest mountain and communed with the wise man to find out when to use scenarios in Logic Games. Now you’re in the home stretch of your studying, and you’re wondering how to proceed.