Tag Archive: reading comprehension

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Which LSAT Concepts to Nail Down Before School Starts Back Up

The start of the school year is coming up, and that means one very important thing: everyone is going to be asking you what you did all summer.

If you’re like me, and freak out in situations where you have to come up with your own answer to questions rather than picking the correct one out of five, I have great news for you. Studying for the LSAT can be editorialized into a perfect response to any inquiry in regards to your summer.

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How to Approach Reading Comp on the Digital LSAT

Earlier this week, we talked about how to take advantage of online resources at your disposal to get prepared to take the digital LSAT. But we didn’t address how you might have to change up your approach to any of the exam’s sections to account for the digital interface. And that’s because — for the most part — you don’t have to. You’re going to get the same types of questions, games, and passages on the digital LSAT that you got on the traditional LSAT. And it is all-but-certain you’ll see more of the test’s favorite concepts, like conditional statements and causation and common logical fallacies.

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The Deal with Outside Information on the LSAT

One of the cool things we’ve recently done at Blueprint is expand our online resources. Over the last year, we’ve instituted a live online course — a full LSAT course we teach through biweekly webinars — and office hours — free daily hangout sessions where instructors go over LSAT concepts and field questions. So after mostly teaching in dusty old classrooms, our instructors are now online, baby.

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Your End-of-Year Review of the 2018 LSATs

You guys, it’s been another fantastic year of the LSAT in the book. Well, if you had to take the LSAT this year, “fantastic” might not be the word that immediately springs to mind. But, at any rate, this year is over. I mean, sure, we technically have eleven more days and two major holidays left to go in 2018 (three if you’re in a Commonwealth country — shouts to Boxing Day). But, for all LSAT-related intents and purposes, this year is over. The final LSAT came and went and was released. Registration for the next LSAT has closed. Our classes have been put on a momentary hiatus for the holidays.

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An Introduction to the LSAT

If you’re perusing this blog, there’s a good chance you’re considering law school. Or maybe your heart has been set on law school since you took your first step. Or maybe you’re just doing some research for a friend or relative who may go to law school.

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Predictions for the November 2018 LSAT

The November LSAT fast approaches, and the time has come for us to brush off our crystal ball and peer into its murky depths in order to bring you some predictions about what you’ll see on the November 2018 LSAT.

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A Look at the September 2018 LSAT: Reading Comprehension

Learning to take the LSAT can sometimes feel like a demoralizing exercise that’s completely inapplicable to the rest of your life (or so I hear). However, future law students can rest assured that they will very much be putting their Reading Comprehension skills to use in each of their core law school classes. While the first passage of the Reading Comp section on the September LSAT gave a lot of students trouble, it’s a passage about a famous Supreme Court case which can perfectly illustrate the use of Reading Comp methods in your upcoming legal studies.

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When You Need to Triage Your LSAT Studies

In a hospital, triage is about assigning degrees of urgency to different patients when there are too many to treat right away. But what does triage look like in the context of the LSAT?

Many LSAT students get to a point when they realize that they just won’t have time to master every possible topic the LSAT could throw at them. Instead of giving each topic equal time, the best thing this student can do is to assign highest priority to those LSAT topics which are most common and most important to success.