Tag Archive: featured

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How Many Practice Exams Should You Take?

If you were tasked, by some cruel and capricious force, with completing a piano recital at a theater full of people, would you start preparing for the performance by attempting to complete the recital, from beginning to end, over and over again? Most of us who don’t know the first thing about pianos could not start this way; those who would have to endure our discordant performances might also prefer we didn’t.

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Should You Register for the September LSAT? The Pros and Cons

September 21st? What’s happening then? Wait a minute….

Like, seriously, another test?! Thanks to LSAC’s new testing schedule, yes! September 21st is in fact the date of the next LSAT. LSAC is offering the LSAT nine times this year — in June, July, September, October, November, January, February, March, and April (the “year” according to LSAC goes from June to May … it’s weird). That’s more testing dates than ever before. So, that means that for the next roughly two months, Life = Studying And Tears Tequila Triumph.

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From the Vaults: On hold? Waitlisted? How to play the law school waiting game

For those of you applying to law school this cycle, we are now in the later stage of the law school application period. I’m sure many of you have noticed there is one constant to this whole process — waiting. You have to wait for your LSAT score, you have to wait for your letters of recommendation, you have to wait for a school to make a decision on your application, etc. Unfortunately, even when a decision is made, your waiting isn’t necessarily over. This post is about two different ways that schools can make you wait longer: by putting you on hold or by putting you on a waitlist.

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Three Tips for Diagramming Conditional Statements

Conditional statements are one of the most powerful tools in your LSAT tool belt. They allow you to properly understand the logical implications of complex statements and to determine what other conclusions can be properly drawn.

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Your Plan for the Last Week of Studying for the LSAT

I recently started the process of training for a marathon. As someone who has never done much distance running, I’ve been doing my best to follow a set training plan. The plan generally involves one progressively longer run per week and several short to medium runs. However, in the final couple weeks, the training plan tapers off and the intensity reduces. This is especially true in the last week of training prior to the race, which has just a couple, shorter runs to get you ready for the big day.

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One Last Piece of Advice …

I’ve been writing blog posts about the LSAT regularly for more than six years, and this is my last one, at least for now, as I move on to new things. It’s been fun, but I won’t bore you with stories about the olden times when logic games were on one page each and you had to bring an extra-sharp pencil to write super small in the margins.

Instead, here’s one takeaway, and it’s one you can use as a student. Sorry, I can’t stop myself.

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Learn About Prescriptive Statements, That’s Doctor’s Orders

If you want to succeed at the LSAT, you really should get to know prescriptive statements. That’s a prescriptive statement — a claim about what “should” or “ought to” be done. These kinds of claims come up a lot on the LSAT and it’s helpful to know what they mean. They also give you hints that certain other things might be going on. Let’s talk a bit about prescriptive statements.

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DOs and DON’Ts of Your Personal Statement

As the Immortal Bard once stated, “Now is the winter of our discontent.” For those of you working on your personal statements can probably relate to his sentiment all too well. For me, writing my personal statement was the worst part of the application process. From coming up with a topic to proofreading it a million times, it was truly a harrowing experience.