Tag Archive: Digital LSAT

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The New LSAT Writing Section: Our Review

A nonprofit organization known as the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) is tasked with facilitating the law school admissions process, in part, by administering the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). LSAC is considering changing part of the LSAT known as “LSAT Writing.” LSAT can either return to the former version of the LSAT Writing section, in which test takers handwrite a short essay at the end of the scored, multiple-choice sections of the exam, or continue to use their recently adopted new version of LSAT Writing, in which test takers write a short essay on a personal computer, anytime within a year following their completion of the scored, multiple-choice sections of the exam.* Using the facts below, write an essay in which you argue for one option over the other based on the following two criteria:

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A Complete Guide to the Strategies You’ll Need on the Digital LSAT

This September, as you’ve probably heard, the LSAT is going digital. You know that, right? Have we talked about it enough? I think we’ve talked about it enough. But if you’re taking this September LSAT, or any future LSAT (at least until The Singularity, when the test will become just brain imaging scan of your cognitive functions administered by our AI overlords), you have to deal with the fact that the test you’ll be taking is on a tablet using LSAC’s proprietary testing software, and not with the newsprint-bound test booklets your forebearers had to endure.

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Combating Digital LSAT Anxiety

I can see it now: You’re eyeing the date in the corner of your laptop screen, counting down the days until the July LSAT. You’ve nailed conditional statements. You know your Reading Comp secondary structures like the back of your hand. You’ve done your part to prepare, but there’s still one factor that’s out of your hands: paper or plastic digital.

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How to Approach Reading Comp on the Digital LSAT

Earlier this week, we talked about how to take advantage of online resources at your disposal to get prepared to take the digital LSAT. But we didn’t address how you might have to change up your approach to any of the exam’s sections to account for the digital interface. And that’s because — for the most part — you don’t have to. You’re going to get the same types of questions, games, and passages on the digital LSAT that you got on the traditional LSAT. And it is all-but-certain you’ll see more of the test’s favorite concepts, like conditional statements and causation and common logical fallacies.

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Getting Prepared for the Digital LSAT

Let’s say you planned on taking the LSAT this year … or, rather, you had a nebulous and ill-defined notion that you should take the LSAT this year … but you missed out on the January, March, and June exams. Then you’re either looking at the rapidly approaching and July exam, or if you missed that registration deadline, then the September or later. And if that describes you, here’s the reality you’re facing: You’re probably going to have to prepare for the digital LSAT.

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We Tried Out the Digital LSAT Practice Exams … Again

A few weeks ago, LSAC updated its digital LSAT familiarization page with new practice exams. Now that we’re creeping ever-closer to the unveiling of the digital LSAT in July, LSAC was kind to let prospective test takers get the full digital experience with full practice exams. And of course, LSAC wants people to get excited about this new technocratic version of the test, so if prospective test takers got jazzed about some of the new features in the digital format, all the better for them.