Tag Archive: applications

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Tips for Making the Career Change to Lawyer

It’s funny, if you Google “career change to lawyer,” you’ll find article after article providing tips to people transitioning from their careers as lawyers to some other field. Keep scrolling and you’ll find the occasional article about making the transition from law student to actual attorney. You won’t find many articles about making a career change from one field to the legal field, however. As a bit of a corrective, that’s what we’ll discuss today. So, assuming the deluge of articles about leaving the field of law didn’t already deter you from pursuing a legal education or career, here are some things you might want to know about making such a career change.

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A Step-by-Step Approach to Applying to Law School

Applying to law school can feel like a labyrinthine process, we know. So we thought, as a bit of public service, we’d simplify this process as best as we can. Here are the fifteen steps you need to take to apply to law school, along with a deluge of links to posts on how to make the most of your law school applications.

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Five Law School Application Errors

Post-Thanksgiving leftovers sandwiches have been devoured and the smell of roasting chestnuts has invaded Christmas markets the country over. Rather than basking in holiday cheer, let’s Grinch it up in here and talk about law school applications.

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The Recent Changes to the LSAT Writing Section and Law School Applications, Explained

When LSAC sends an email out to everyone with an active LSAC account, you know there’s about to be some serious, capital-“N” News announced. And last Wednesday, that’s exactly what LSAC did. So when I got that email, I didn’t read passed the first four words of the subject line — which read, forebodingly, “Changes to the LSAT” — before frantically opening the email to see which changes LSAC wrought to the exam. Would they finally clarify how the Logic Games section might be changing? Would they add even more test administrations? Would they concede that, actually, the digital LSAT is more trouble than it’s worth, and go back to the traditional paper-and-pencil test?

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How to Prepare for Law School as Sophomore

Hello, overachieving sophomore! Sophomore year of college is an exciting time, is it not? You’re finally getting to pick your own classes rather than take core requirements, navigated the party scene campus life, and may even be applying to internships.

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How to Prepare for Law School as a Freshman

Hi! I am a college freshman hoping to go to law school! What should I be doing?

Best,
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My first reaction to questions like the above is a simple, “Wow.” While most college freshman are worrying about who they’ll sit with in the dining hall, some nerds pre-law freshman are worrying about LAW SCHOOL. Ugh.

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Your Guide to the Updated 2019-2020 LSAT Schedule

There’s a brave new world of LSAT opportunities for those students planning to take the test in 2019. Not only are students choosing among seven test dates, but they also have the option of taking the exam multiple times and (potentially) in different formats.

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What Canceling Your LSAT Score Means for Your Application

You just finished your first LSAT. You’re nervous, exhausted and just happy it’s finally over with. But mostly terrified; how awful will your score actually be? Well, you could always cancel, up to six days after the test date, and on this particular July exam LSAC will very generously offer to show you your score before you decide whether you want to do so.

So, what’s the catch? Law schools will be able to see that you decided to cancel a test on your score report, and may hold that against you. But will they?