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What Canceling Your LSAT Score Means for Your Application

You just finished your first LSAT. You’re nervous, exhausted and just happy it’s finally over with. But mostly terrified; how awful will your score actually be? Well, you could always cancel, up to six days after the test date, and on this particular July exam LSAC will very generously offer to show you your score before you decide whether you want to do so.

So, what’s the catch? Law schools will be able to see that you decided to cancel a test on your score report, and may hold that against you. But will they?

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Law School Dispatches: Where You Live Matters

Law students will share different opinions about the best way to prepare for law school in the summer before your first year (whether it’s reading up on how to take law school exams, or perfecting that summer tan and putting off work for as long as possible). As a law student about to enter my 2L year, I’ve been giving advice to several incoming law students that has little to do with the academics of law school, but probably matters a great deal to a student’s performance and general well-being over the three years of a law school program. That topic is law student housing.

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Law School Admissions Application Checklist

Is everyone alive after the July LSAT? I know, I know, what’s worse: actually taking the test, the after test self-reflection, or the cruel waiting time until scores are released? The good news is that, if you took the July LSAT, you have six whole weeks to get together everything you need to prepare a completed law school application!

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July LSAT Scores Are Over a Month Away: What to Do in the Meantime

You did it! The hard part is over. The studying, the agonizing, the making new-best-friends with a couple of fetchingly designed spiral-bound LSAT guides. All that’s behind you now. Rest in pieces, July LSAT. Can I hear a “wahoo”?

But now what?