Category Archive: Admissions

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How to Prepare for Law School as Sophomore

Hello, overachieving sophomore! Sophomore year of college is an exciting time, is it not? You’re finally getting to pick your own classes rather than take core requirements, navigated the party scene campus life, and may even be applying to internships.

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How to Prepare for Law School as a Freshman

Hi! I am a college freshman hoping to go to law school! What should I be doing?

Best,
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My first reaction to questions like the above is a simple, “Wow.” While most college freshman are worrying about who they’ll sit with in the dining hall, some nerds pre-law freshman are worrying about LAW SCHOOL. Ugh.

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How to Use Law School Predictors

Finally, finally, there’s a nip in the air. The leaves are changing colors and the semester’s first solo cup pyramids have collapsed under the weight of mid-semester exam prep. You know what that means. It’s pumpkin spice season! Also, time to get working on those law school applications.

“But, but … how do I know where to apply?” you might be saying. You may also be saying, “Actually, I’ve been dreaming of going to Harvard Law since I saw Legally Blonde as an impressionable youth. How hard could it be to get in?”

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Your Guide to the Updated 2019-2020 LSAT Schedule

There’s a brave new world of LSAT opportunities for those students planning to take the test in 2019. Not only are students choosing among seven test dates, but they also have the option of taking the exam multiple times and (potentially) in different formats.

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Which Schools Are Accepting the GRE Now?

For years, law schools were wedded to the LSAT. Like any marriage, it had its ups and downs, but it was a bedrock relationship. The LSAT, after all, was the test developed for law schools. The LSAT pledged to help law school assess the lawyerly mettle of applicants; law schools promised to use the LSAT as its primary means of applicant appraisal. Through these vows, a mutually beneficial partnership was forged.

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It’s Application Time: How to Choose Your Schools

You’ve finally got your application all together — LSAT score, transcript, letters of recommendation, and personal statement all uploaded to LSAC and ready to be sent out to the 203 ABA-accredited law schools. But clearly you don’t want to waste valuable time and money on all of them, so you’re going to want to prioritize that list down to schools that are both good fits for you, personally and professionally, as well as ones that you have a good shot at being admitted to.

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What Law Schools Look For in Your LSAT Writing Sample

Ah, the LSAT writing sample. You will never find a more wretched collection of half-formed arguments and poor writing. You should be careful.

Or not.

Because, in all honesty, it doesn’t matter very much.

The writing sample on the LSAT always evokes a feeling of dread from first-time LSAT test-takers. You’ve sat in a room for over three hours, nerves shot and caffeine headache pounding, with dozens of other students, many of whom haven’t showered in the past few days in order to maximize their study time. The last thing anyone wants to do is write an essay.

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Anna Ivey’s Take on Canceled Scores

Have you heard of cancel culture? It essentially means when someone (or something) has become so irrelevant or problematic that it no longer becomes necessary to acknowledge their existence. And so, we “cancel” them. For example, Logan Paul? Canceled. Accepting less than what you deserve? Canceled. Licking ice cream you didn’t purchase? Double canceled.  However,