Category Archive: General LSAT Advice

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Anna Ivey’s Take on Canceled Scores

Have you heard of cancel culture? It essentially means when someone (or something) has become so irrelevant or problematic that it no longer becomes necessary to acknowledge their existence. And so, we “cancel” them. For example, Logan Paul? Canceled. Accepting less than what you deserve? Canceled. Licking ice cream you didn’t purchase? Double canceled.  However,

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Three Last-Minute July LSAT Tips

With the July LSAT just a few days away, you should be using your remaining study time to fine-tune your approach. Hopefully by now you’ve nailed down your basic strategy for each section, but here are a few last-minute tips to help you grab an extra point or two.

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When to Take the LSAT

As an LSAT instructor, it is natural to receive the same questions from students over the years. It almost gets to a point where you can predict the issues that students will raise and when they will be raised. However, there is one question that reigns supreme: When is the best time to take the LSAT?

Now, before we actually attempt to answer this question (here’s another stab at the answer), it requires a bit of inquiry into what that question actually even means. The LSAT is given four times a year: February, June, September/October, and December.

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Dos and Don’ts Before Starting Your LSAT Prep Course

If anyone can be described as Type-A, it’s law students and—by extension—pre-law students. Planning ahead is simply second nature to you. This means it’s time for all of you who want to take the LSAT and get a score that will enable you to apply early in the process to start thinking about signing up for an LSAT class. We get a flood of questions from people wondering what they should do before their LSAT class begins. Since we have a fair bit of knowledge in this arena, I’ve put together a list.

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Studying for the LSAT and Your Finals … at the Same Time

The June LSAT is on its way. If you’re a student, so are finals. The best part of college. The memories you’ll revisit with your friends for years and years. If you’re on the semester system you’ll probably have finals well out of the way before the LSAT. If you’re on the quarter system, finals will likely be there to distract you in the final weeks leading up to the LSAT. Either way, you’ll have to balance studying for finals with studying for the LSAT.

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Breaking Down LSAT Questions: the Three Sections

If you’re reading this blog, congratulations on deciding to take the LSAT! Say goodbye to your peace of mind and social life, and get mentally prepared to spend a few months gaming the LSAT format to squeeze every available second out of your LSAT test questions. Many things about the LSAT are changing (we’re still recovering from the bombshell that the LSAT is going digital), but the typical LSAT question on each of the three sections remains largely the same. For the uninitiated, here’s a complete LSAT sections breakdown.

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The Best Free Tools to Help with Your LSAT Prep

As much as we like to encourage and motivate you on your journey to law school, LSAT prep is hard and requires a major commitment. Stop me when I lie. How long should you study for the LSAT? The average student should study for at least two months at 20 hours per week. Plus, you [eventually] have to pay the application fees when you apply to law school, on top of the LSAT registration fee (plural, if you take it more than once). But before you go up to the top and close this tab because the truth hurts, continue reading to discover some great and free tools to make your studying so much more manageable.

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Battle LSAT Anxiety with Your Brain (and Butt)

Test anxiety is real, and the LSAT brings about an entire cornucopia of emotions. It’s understandable; you’ve spent months preparing for this test that will determine where you spend the next few years of year life and possibly even who will hire you after graduation. Plus, you really don’t want to retake the LSAT and go through that endeavor all over again (but you might have to).  Walking into your test room as prepared as possible is one way to deal with LSAT test anxiety, but there are other techniques to keep you cool, calm, and collected before, during, and after the LSAT.

For today’s post we brought in recently licensed marriage and family therapist Megan Riley to share her thoughts on controlling test day anxiety.